Nouns (0)

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Verbs (11)

wipe out, run through, use up, eat up, exhaust, deplete, eat, consume
v. use up (resources or materials); "this car consumes a lot of gas"; "We exhausted our savings"; "They run through 20 bottles of wine a week"
polish off, eat up, finish
v. finish eating all the food on one's plate or on the table; "She polished off the remaining potatoes"

Adverbs (0)

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Adjectives (0)

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Fuzzynyms (43)

clear up, clear
v. free (the throat) by making a rasping sound; "Clear the throat"
shrivel, shrink
v. decrease in size, range, or extent; "His earnings shrank"; "My courage shrivelled when I saw the task before me"
wither, fade
v. lose freshness, vigor, or vitality; "Her bloom was fading"
empty
v. make void or empty of contents; "Empty the box"; "The alarm emptied the building"
authorise, clear, pass, authorize
v. grant authorization or clearance for; "Clear the manuscript for publication"; "The rock star never authorized this slanderous biography"
take in, have, take, ingest, consume
v. serve oneself to, or consume regularly; "Have another bowl of chicken soup!"; "I don't take sugar in my coffee"
bolt, gobble
v. eat hastily without proper chewing; "Don't bolt your food!"
fulfil, fulfill, fill, satisfy, meet
v. fill or meet a want or need
guttle, pig, raven, devour
v. eat greedily; "he devoured three sandwiches"
go through, down, consume, devour
v. eat immoderately; "Some people can down a pound of meat in the course of one meal"
tap
v. pierce in order to draw a liquid from; "tap a maple tree for its syrup"; "tap a keg of beer"
shower
v. provide abundantly with; "He showered her with presents"
squander, blow, waste
v. spend thoughtlessly; throw away; "He wasted his inheritance on his insincere friends"; "You squandered the opportunity to get and advanced degree"
use up, run down, tire, exhaust, sap
v. deplete; "exhaust one's savings"; "We quickly played out our strength"
tap
v. draw (liquor) from a tap; "tap beer in a bar"
clear
v. pass an inspection or receive authorization; "clear customs"

Synonyms (3)

eat
v. take in solid food; "She was eating a banana"; "What did you eat for dinner last night?"
pass over, wipe
v. rub with a circular motion; "wipe the blackboard"; "He passed his hands over the soft cloth"

Antonyms (0)

There are no items for this category

Research

Eating (also known as consuming) is the ingestion of food, typically to provide a heterotrophic organism with energy and to allow for growth. Animals and other heterotrophs must eat in order to survive — carnivores eat other animals, herbivores eat plants, omnivores consume a mixture of both plant and animal matter, and detritivores eat detritus. Fungi digest organic matter outside their bodies as opposed to animals that digest their food inside their bodies. For humans, eating is an activity of daily living. Some individuals may limit their amount of nutritional intake. This may be a result of a lifestyle choice, due to hunger or famine, as part of a diet or as religious fasting.

Eating practices among humans

 Women eating biscuits in England
 
 A girl eating a cake

Many homes have a large eating room or outside (in the tropics) kitchen area devoted to preparation of meals and food, and may have a dining room, dining hall, or another designated area for eating. Some trains have a dining car.

Most societies also have restaurants, food courts, and food vendors so that people may eat when away from home, when lacking time to prepare food, or as a social occasion (dining club).[1] At their highest level of sophistication, these places become "theatrical spectacles of global cosmopolitanism and myth."[2] At picnics, potlucks, and food festivals, eating is in fact the primary purpose of a social gathering. At many social events, food and beverages are made available to attendees.

Dishware, silverware, drinkware, and cookware come in a wide array of forms and sizes.

People usually have two or three meals a day regularly. Snacks of smaller amounts may be consumed between meals. Doctors in the UK, recommend three meals a day ( with between 400-600 kcal per meal),[3][4] with four to six hours between.[5] Having three well-balanced meals (thus half of the plate with vegetables,[6] 1/4 protein food as meat, ... and 1/4 carbohydrates as pasta, rice, ...) will then account to some 1800–2000 kcal, which is the average requirement for a regular person.[7]

The issue of healthy eating has long been an important concern to individuals and cultures. Among other practices, fasting, dieting, and vegetarianism are all techniques employed by individuals and encouraged by societies to increase longevity and health. Some religions promote vegetarianism, considering it wrong to consume animals. Leading nutritionists believe that instead of indulging oneself in three large meals each day, it is much healthier and easier on the metabolism to eat five smaller meals each day (e.g. better digestion, easier on the lower intestine to deposit wastes; whereas larger meals are tougher on the digestive tract and may call for the use of laxatives.[8] However, psychiatrists with Yale Medical School have found that people who suffer from Binge Eating Disorder (BED) and consume three meals per day weigh less than those who have meals that are more frequent. Eating can also be a way of making money (see competitive eating). In jurisdictions under sharia law, it may be proscribed for Muslim adults during the daylight hours of Ramadan.[9][10][11]

Development in humans

 Eating with fork at a restaurant
 
 Traditional way of eating in Uzbekistan
 
 Girl with chopsticks
 
 Ethiopians eating with hands

Newborn babies do not eat adult foods. They survive solely on breast milk or formula.[12] Small amounts of pureed food are sometimes fed to young infants as young as two or three months old, but most infants do not eat adult food until they are between six and eight months old. Young babies eat pureed baby foods because they have few teeth and immature digestive systems. Between 8 and 12 months of age, the digestive system improves, and many babies begin eating finger foods. Their diet is still limited, however, because most babies lack molars or canines at this age, and often have a limited number of incisors. By 18 months, babies often have enough teeth and a sufficiently mature digestive system to eat the same foods as adults. Learning to eat is a messy process for children, and children often do not master neatness or eating etiquette until they are 5 or 6 years old.

Eating positions

Eating positions vary according to the different regions of the world, as culture influences the way people eat their meals. For example, most of the Middle Eastern countries, eating while sitting on the floor is most common, and it is believed to be healthier than eating while sitting to a table.[13][14]

References

  1. ^ John Raulston Saul (1995), "The Doubter's Companion", 155
  2. ^ David Grazian (2008), "On the Make: The Hustle of Urban Nightlife", 32
  3. ^ "Be calorie smart 400-600-600". nhs.uk. Retrieved 25 May 2017.
  4. ^ "Cut down on your calories". nhs.uk. 15 October 2015. Retrieved 25 May 2017.
  5. ^ Sen, Debarati (27 July 2016). "How often should you eat?". Times of India. Retrieved 25 May 2017.
  6. ^ Half of plate to be filled with vegetables, according to Harvard School of Public Health
  7. ^ Calorie requirements for regular person estimated at 2000 kcal
  8. ^ Micheals, Jullian. "FitWatch - Free Online Calorie Counter & Diet Tracker / Weight Loss Tools and Calculators." FitWatch RSS. N.p., n.d. Web. 13 Mar. 2013.
  9. ^ Sharia and Social Engineering: p 143, R. Michael Feener - 2013
  10. ^ FOOD & EATING IN MEDIEVAL EUROPE - Page 73, Joel T. Rosenthal - 1998
  11. ^ Conscious Eating: Second Edition - Page 9, Gabriel Cousens, M.D. - 2009
  12. ^ "How to combine breast and bottle feeding". nhs.uk. Retrieved 5 October 2017.
  13. ^ Donovan, Sandy (2010). The Middle Eastern American Experience. United States: Twenty-First Century Books. p. 68. ISBN 9780761363613.
  14. ^ Brito, Leonardo Barbosa Barreto de; Ricardo, Djalma Rabelo; Araújo, Denise Sardinha Mendes Soares de; Ramos, Plínio Santos; Myers, Jonathan; Araújo, Claudio Gil Soares de (2012-12-13). "Ability to sit and rise from the floor as a predictor of all-cause mortality". European Journal of Preventive Cardiology21: 2047487312471759. doi:10.1177/2047487312471759. ISSN 2047-4873. PMID 23242910. Archived from the original on 2013-01-12.
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